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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
both. >> reporter: after the u.n. security council disbanded without announcing any punishment, the white house and state department signaled intention to outsource the job to the north korea patron state china. >> i think you saw the chinese make clore their opposition to this launch, prior to it and the regret over the fact it took place after it happened. >> we are very much ready to engage with our colleagues on the council. we will be searching for a clear and credible response. >> kim jung un is expected to capitalize on the boost of the internal standing that the launch provided to move to conduct another nuclear test. five years ago, then senator obama vowed for diplomacy with dictators like kim. >> would you be willing to meet with the leaders of iran, syria, venezuela, cuba, north korea? to bring the gap the divides our countries. >> i would. the reason is this. the notion that somehow not talking to countries is punishment to them, which has been the guiding diplomatic principle of this administration is ridiculous. >> yet, it was under the bush administration that t
to put a satellite into orbit. right now the u.n. security council is meeting behind closed doors to discuss a response. in the meantime a lot of talk happening in d.c. national security correspondent jennifer griffin is live at the pentagon with more on this. so far, what is the reaction? >> reporter: we heard from u.s. officials, they are calling this very highly provocative act. it has been a swift response. we have a statement from national security council spokesman tommy vitter. he said, quote, this action is yet another example of north korea's pattern of irresponsible behavior. the united states remains vigilant in the face of north korean provocations and fully committed to the security of our allies in the region, devoting scarce resources to the development of ballistic missiles and nuclear weapons has not brought north korea security and skaept tans by the international community and never will. jenna, as you mentioned the u.n. security council is meeting as we speak behind closed doors. the north koreans have very little to fear in terms of serious sanctions as a resu
accountable. >> i can't wait to see what that is going to be. given the propensity the u.n. can get it fixed if he does use chemical weapons we will send him a letter. if that doesn't work a strongly worded letter and if that doesn't work, we will send him a really strongly worded letter with all of the words in bold type. you know the tragedy is the president promised us he understood people in these muslim countries and they would listen to him in a way they didn't listen to previous presidents. how is that working out for us? it is not working out at all. egypt is a mess, syria is in civil war between 40 and 50,000 people killed by its own government. problems in tunisia. problems still remaining in afghanistan and that corrupt government. i am still waiting to find out what it is that we are going to do that scares iran enough to shut down the nuclear program. in the meantime are we putting any real muscle on these crazy mad men? no demanding israel to stop bed rins. i think somehow we are missing something. i think we put more pressure on crazy governments building nuclear devices and r
sclinten a powder keg of instability in the region and beyond. the u.n. security council will likely vote authorizing a military intervention. similar african led super vention have provided a model for multilateral and regionly led solutions that allow the united states and our allies to provide operational support without putting boots on the ground. this will take time and stability cannot be restored through military action alone. the situation in malli is as much a crisis of governance as of security. the long running grievances between the north and the south must be addressed through diplomacy, rebuilding democratic institutions the restoration of democratically elected government. any agreement that tends to peel off groups aligned will require a credible government to do so. elections are the key to not only resolving and restoring now frozen assistance but reclaiming government control of the north and restoring the nearly three decade long history of democracy. the challenges cannot be addressed as separate issues as the recent report suggested. the international community must
. brazilia was inaugurated in april of 1960. he also designed that most international of buildings, the u.n. headquarters in new york city. thanks for being part of my program this week. i will see you next week. >>> hello, i'm alison kosik with a check of our top stories. going over the fiscal cliff could send the u.s. economy into verse. christine lagarde spoke with candy kroll crowley about how a needs to be hammered out. >> the best way to go forward is to have a balanced a i approach that takes into account both increasing the revenue, which means either raising tax or creating new sources of revenue and cutting spendings as well. >> the imf has a real interest in how the u.s. economy is doing because it will d
in in a way. we continu that way. martha: ambassador john bolton, former ambassador to the u.n. and a fox news contributor joins me now. good to see you. >> good morning, martha. martha: we've heard from the administration that the loading of these weapons basically would be a red line that could not be crossed. a lot of questions where the line exists. i wonder what you think about leon panetta's statement there, is he trying to court of cool the heels on this situation a little bit? >> it may simply be that the administration never had adequate plans to do something, once the risk of bashar al-assad's use of chemical weapons really approached putting them into combat situations. the absence of intelligence doesn't tell you anything, as the saying goes, the absence of evidence is not evidence of absence. what bashar al-assad is doing with the weapons may simply be hidden from us, not that he's not doing anything. the real question is making sure that those weapons don't get outside of syria, where they could be used by terrorist worldwide. at least that's what i think the highest u.s. priorit
made it very clear at the u.n. general assembly where the israeli red line is. but there is an argument that there is no american red line, there is an american invisible line, and no one is sure where it is. not the iranians, not us, not the israelis. do you share that concern? is there anything we can do to establish a more conclusive and defined redline so that it helps us in our negotiating strategy with the iranians? as we were reminded this morning, persians negotiate in the bazaar. do we have an america that we can more clearly defined -- american red line that we can more clearly define? >> there are a couple of reasons by the military threat is important. as sandy indicated, the iranians to respond to credible threats of force. -- do respond to credible threats of force. if you read the biographies of the hostage-takers, they said they were afraid ronald reagan was going to act like a cowboy. the release the hostages the minute he was sworn in. the soviets threatened to bomb tehran, and the hostages were let go. it is important to note that the iran-iraq war came to win and win
rights abuses in iran. i would just read briefly from the report that the u.n. special wrote and file to the u.n. general assembly in september of 2011 when there was a pattern of systemic violations of human rights. iran has refused access to the united nations special representative on human rights. in september, 2011, the un secretary-general submitted a report to the general assembly in which he said he was "deeply troubled by reports of increased numbers of executions, amputations, arbitrary arrests and detentions, unfair trials, torture, and ill treatment and bemoaned the crackdown on human rights activists, lawyers, journalists, and opposite -- and opposition activists." one example from the week's news -- there was what qualifies in iran as a some good news -- a well-known human rights lawyer ended her 49-day hunger strike on december four. she has been imprisoned since 2010 and the regime had imposed a travel ban on her husband and 12-year-old daughter. she was on a hunger strike for 49 days and has actually stopped of thunderstrike amid an indication that the regime will lif
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)